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Pipestone National Monument

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Pipestone National Monument is the home of historic pipestone quarries, beautiful tallgrass prairies, and the majestic Winnewissa Falls.

For countless generations, American Indians have quarried the red pipestone found at this site. These grounds are sacred to many people because the pipestone quarried here is carved into pipes used for prayer. Many believe that the pipe's smoke carries one's prayer to the Great Spirit. The traditions of quarrying and pipemaking continue here today.

Pipestone National Monument was established on August 25, 1937. Pipestone National Monument is one of the few places in the United States that has deep spiritual meaning to more than one culture.

What does Pipestone National Monument have to offer?
Sacred Pipestone quarries, tallgrass prairie, Winnewissa Waterfall, petroglyphs, a 3/4-mile paved trail along the quarries, creek, and waterfall, visitor center and museum, Pipestone cultural demonstrators (May through October), orientation film, Pipestone Indian Shrine Association bookstore and gift shop, and a Junior Ranger Program for Kids.

Images

National Park Service Logo
Quartzite Staircase on Circle Trail - Photo by Kristen Brockberg
Sioux Quartzite Ridgeline along Circle Trail - Photo by Erica Volkir
Bison Petroglyph & Mural at Visitors Center - Photo by Erica Volkir
Winnewissa Falls - Photo by Erica Volkir
Morning Light Along Circle Trail - Photo by Julie Carrow
Kids Earning Junior Ranger Badge at Visitors Center - Photo by Erica Volkir
Pipestone National Monument Junior Ranger Badge - Photo by Erica Volkir
Ranger Guided Hike on Circle Trail - Photo by Erica Volkir
Junior Rangers at Pipestone National Monument Visitors Center - Photo by Erica Volkir
First Day Hike Guided Hike - Photo by Erica Volkir
Smooth Sumac along Circle Trail - Photo by David Rambow
Cultural Demonstrator Travis Erickson - Photo by Linda Flanagan
Autumn's Kiss of Winnewissa Falls - Photo by Linda Flanagan
Above Winnewissa Falls - Photo by Karen Vaux
Old Stone Face above Circle Trail - Photo by Erica Volkir
Circle Trail Along Sioux Quartzite Ridgeline - Photo by Erica Volkir
Grasshopper on Sunflower along Circle Trail - Photo by Erica Volkir
Native American Beadwork at Visitors Center - Photo by Erica Volkir
1838 Joseph Nicollet Expedition Inscription - Photo by Erica Volkir
1838 Joseph Nicollet Expedition Marker - Photo by Erica Volkir
Moh's Geologic Scale of Hardness
Native American Prayer Flags Along Circle Trail - Photo by Erica Volkir
Prayer Flags at Pipestone Quarry - Photo by Rich Gergen
Blazing Star Along Circle Trail - Photo by Erica Volkir
Three Maidens Spiritual Site - Granite Glacial Erratics - Photo by Erica Volkir
Snow Shoes Available at Visitor Center - Photo by Erica Volkir
Snowshoeing with 605 Magazine Staff - Photo by Erica Volkir
Moss & Lichens Along Circle Trail - Photo by Erica Volkir
Bison Pipe by Travis Erickson - Photo by Erica Volkir

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